Shipwrecks of famous shipping lines

Socotra (1)

1897-1915, Le Touquet

Socotra (1)

History

The purpose-built general-cargo liner Socotra (1) was built for P&O by Palmer’s Shipbuilding & Iron Co., Hebburn-on-Tyne, and launched on 3 December 1896. Twin screws were powered by two triple-expansion steam engines. The Socotra (1) was the sister ship of the preceding Candia (2).

Stranded near Le Touquet when homeward bound from Australia with wool and general cargo, due to navigational error. No casualties.

 

Statistics
Built1897
Lost26-Nov-1915
Tonnage6044
Dimensions137.2 x 15.9 m (450 x 52.2 ft)
Speed14 knots
FateWrecked

Wreck

The remains of the Socotra (1) lie in very shallow water just a few hundred metres out from the beach at Le Touquet on a vast expanse of flat sand. The wreck can be visuted by foot when tidal conditions permit.

The amount of the wreck that is visible depends on the constantly shifting sand. Generally it is the stern section that is the most prominent, standing a couple of metres high. The separate bow section rests about 100m away and is nearly always completely covered. The port propeller shaft is still enclosed in its tunnel, whereas the starboard one is completely exposed and hangs suspended above the rest of the wreck. If the sand has receded sufficiently then it may be possible to sea one of the boilers.

 

Dive Data
Position50.509633, 1.568683
Depth1m (3ft)
Tides
Visibility

Dive Operators
    None
More Information

Gallery

Videos

Timelapse footage of dawn breaking over the wreck (March 2015).